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RingThe world has set a new record never before has a ring being entirely made of a single diamond. How did they do it? Who had this crazy idea? How many carats is it and the big question is how much does it cost and who will buy it? They say diamonds are a girl’s best friend; well this one ought to provide a lifelong companionship.

The 150 carat all diamond ring was made with laser technology. Multiple tests were done to get the precision of the circle right. Special laser equipment was bought to cut the diamond directly and not alter the colour of it.  It was made by a labor of love and took a couple years in the process for making it.  Mohamed Shawesh, president and CEO of Geneva-based Shawish Jewelry was the genius and passion behind this stunning piece. “A ring made entirely of a faceted diamond has always seemed like a fantasy, It seemed impossible, so we decided to embark on the adventure of creating it. To create the perfect diamond ring is the epitome of art.” Says Mohamed Shawesh. It had been a dream of his from way back. In 2009 he sought to get the copyright to design the ring and in 2010 it was finalized but it still had a lot more time to go.

They had to go through a lengthy process of designs to get the ring to its perfect precision. Shawish speaks of this, “We had to do multiple tests with the design, to get the precision of the circle right. Diamonds are made of carbon and molecules that can change, even the colour can be altered when attempting to cut it. We had to buy special laser equipment, to cut directly into the diamond. The most important aspect is preserving the integrity of the diamond and of course the most difficult phase is precision cutting an entire stone into a ring.”

A couple years later in 2012 all the dreaming, fantasizing, and hard work has paid off. The 150 carat ring now goes for about $70 million.

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KidArkansas Crater of Diamonds State park has been a great place to find diamonds. Just this year alone the diamonds found at the park are about 327. In 2012 a total of 530 diamonds were found, 131 of them brown and 100 of them yellow. The lucky one this time to find the 27th largest diamond ever found in the park would go to 12 year old Michael Dettlaff, of Apex, N.C. He was searching for less than 10 minutes when he saw something shinier than a rock and picked it up. It had been raining that morning and the family almost didn’t go. The rain helps to sink the dirt down and allow the stone to rise to the surface more.  He named it “God’s Glory Diamond.” The gem is honey brown and the size of a jelly bean, it has a beautiful metallic luster and interesting notches says park interpreter Waymon Cox.

Another  lucky man is named Steve Vehige, him and his 17 year old son, had come to the site four times before being rewarded with such a find. Both of them spent 3 days digging a 37 and half acre search area.  He stumbled upon the brown diamond while mumbling aloud to another park visitor about what a rough diamond would look like. Lo and behold he was holding one in his hand at the same moment he was inquiring about it. He has called his discovery the “Flint Hill Special” in respect to his hometown.

A park interpreter, Margi Jenks, said that rain increases your chances of surface finds and that year in July the rainfall in the park reached 10 inches. “Diamonds … stay put when it rains and the dirt surrounding and covering the diamonds washes away. I knew from past experience that Saturday’s sunny skies would probably result in some nice diamond finds,” she said.

FindOther semi-precious stones and minerals found in the park are amethyst, peridot, garnet, jasper, agate, berite, calcite, and quartz. Around 40 different rocks and minerals are found in the Arkansas Crater making it a great treasure hunt for those who visit. A total of 75, 000 diamonds have been unearthed from the site since the first was found back in 1906. The largest diamond to be discovered in the US was at the Arkansas Park its name is Uncle Sam, a white diamond with pink cast weighing at 40 carats.

The Crater of Diamonds in Arkansas is the world’s only diamond producing site that is open to the public. An average of two diamonds are found per day in the park. Whatever kind of gem the visitor finds it gets to keep and the park provides free identification and registration.

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cheapsidehoardfullA treasure that was uncovered 100 years ago by a workman is going to now be on display for the first time next fall in the Museum of London.  The entire chest called the Cheapside Hoard which includes hundreds of gold and gem studded Tudor and Jacobean jewellery.  There are many questions and possible murder mystery tales surrounding this jewellery which makes its value more than just its weight in gold. It also can tell us about the life during this time in London a period from between 1558 to 1625. Some questions that arise are whose jewels were these? Why was it hidden? Why hasn’t it ever been claimed?

It was first discovered in 1912 when it was buried in a cellar on Cheapside in the City of London.  A workman’s pickaxe smashed through the brick floor more than a century ago and it was left forgotten. When an old house was being demolished on Cheapside the hoard was found and remains priceless.

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“Nothing in the world comes close,” said Museum of London curator Hazel Forsyth. He has been studying the pieces for a long time now. Some of the jewelry includes necklaces, rings, brooches, chains, pearls, rubies, fan holders, scent bottles and two carved gems dating back 1,300 years ago. The most delicate of items are fine gold enamel chains with gems on them up to two meters long they were stitched on gowns and hung from collar to waist as a dazzling display. “This collection has been misunderstood and misinterpreted, dismissed as jewelry for the merchant classes,” Forsyth said. “But at this date the merchants were among the wealthiest people in the land; they had far more disposable wealth than the aristocracy.” Along with the massive rubies, and pearls the size of acorns there are sapphires, emeralds and some fake stones made of quartz crystal which have been dyed and carved to look like precious gems.

New research of a specific gem known as “The Stafford Intaglio”, an oval shaped piece of engraved cornelian, suggest the time it was buried between 1640 and 1666.  The engraved piece is a badge of Stafford with a swan and a wreath, there was only one Viscount Stafford by the name of William Howard in 1640.

broochTwo other pieces from the Cheapside Hoard is a salamander shaped brooch set with Colombian emeralds and table cut diamonds from India. The other is a gold enamel ring set with moonstone and engraved with a frog.

Another extremely rare piece is a hexagonal emerald watch, one of the most unusual and decadent pieces found, one of a kind no other in its era had ever been recorded.

All these jewels will be displayed together they are the single most important knowledge of early modern jewelry worldwide.

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footballsizegem2This football sized gem has come out of hiding and is looking for a new home but one that will make sure the unique marvel can get viewed on a regular basis. The giant sapphire gem was carved and designed by an Italian artist Alessio Boschi. It took two years to complete and was finished by the year 2000. The 28cm Millennium Sapphire was found in Madagascar in 1995. It weighed 90,000 carats while in its rough state but lost about a third of its mass because of the carving process. The carvers practiced each 134 design on pieces of lapis lazuli.

The sapphire is a tribute of human genius and each 134 design is a different subject including faces. Some of the human genius that is carved onto this stone are faces of Michelangelo, Shakespeare, Martin Luther King, Beethoven, and Albert Einstein. It also has representations of the Great Wall of China, the Pyramids of Giza, and Gutenberg’s printing press.

Currently a union of investors with Daniel McKinney as the leader owns the Millennium Sapphire. In the past 15 years the magnificent carving has only been on public display twice. In the times its not on display it is tucked away in a safe of an undisclosed U.S location. The union agreed that this amazing work needs to be enjoyed by the public. The owners didn’t want to put it up for auction because they wouldn’t be able to control the buyer and someone might have it just for their private display.

“We’ve got offers in the past from various millionaires and billionaires from China and other places to buy it for themselves,” McKinney told The National, “but they would probably put it in their mausoleum and it would be lost to the world.”

“It would be great if it could be displayed in a museum as that’s why it was created,” said Scott Chapman, an associate of McKinney. “The consortium wants to be able to display it and show it.”

For now it is on sale if the right buyer can come up with $180 million and promise to have the 61,500 carat gem to be housed where the public can view it regularly.

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Sapphire HeatSapphires come in every colour except a certain shade of red called a ruby. There are several different methods to enhance and improve the colour and clarity of a sapphire. Commonly practiced treatments are heating a natural sapphire to heighten the look of the stone. Heating a sapphire is done by placing it in a furnace at temperatures between 500 and 1800°C for several hours.  Another way is by heating it in a nitrogen-deficient atmosphere oven for seven days or more. With this process the stones become bluer and lose some of their inclusions like the silk kind. When higher temperatures are used the stone loses all silk inclusions and under magnification the stone is clear. Sapphire and other gemstones being heat treated goes back to Roman times. An untreated natural stone is somewhat rare and will be sold with a certificate from a gemology lab.

Another treatment is diffusion to add impurities to the sapphire and enhance the colour. A type of chemical element called beryllium is diffused into the sapphire with very high heat. Many colours of sapphires are being treated with beryllium. At first orange sapphires were created with this process but now the process has been advanced and many different colours can be produced.

Sapphire Heat

On the other hand a type of sapphire called “Yogo” sometimes does not need to be heat treated because of their natural cornflower blue colour. These sapphires have a deep blue uniform clarity and are generally free of any characteristics or inclusions. Intergem Limited started marketing the Yogos in the 1980’s as the world’s only untreated sapphire guaranteed. By 1982 heat treatment became a major issue at that time 95% of all the worlds sapphires were being heated to bring out their natural colour. The guarantee of Intergems marketing of Yogos set them apart of many in the gem industry. The issue ended up on front page of the Wall Street Journal in 1984 with the headline “Sapphire Marketer Upsets the Gem Industry.”

How to tell if your sapphire has been heat treated? Usually a small UV lamp can help check the gem quickly for any potential alterations. Any stones that have a chalky florescence are most likely heat treated. Taking it to a certified gem dealer with GIA industry standards is a good way to have them test it.

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DiamondThe most flawless, biggest briolette ever to surface at auction weighing at a stunning 75.36ct broke records! This diamond was sold for a world record at $11,145,734 from an anonymous buyer at Christie’s Hong Kong’s Magnificent Jewels sale. This pendant necklace was originally valued at a pre-sale low estimate of $8.5 million, which it easily surpassed.  It did fall short of its high pre-sale estimate of $12.5 million.

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The briolette is a traditional cut popular in the Victorian times but has recently become more popular in precious and semi-precious stones. It is a stone cut into a three-dimensional waterdrop shape.  Its elegant pear shape with cut facets dangles below a marquise-cut purplish-pink diamond. Adorned with stations of smaller briolettes with 18 karat white and rose gold adjustable neck chain, this piece is a classy stunner!

An auction spokesperson said the diamond was “perfect,” and had the proof of an assessment with the Gemological Institute of America. The GIA rated the stone Type IIa, which is the top quality grade.  The diamond is similar to the British Queen Elizabeth’s one she has set in her crown. Christie’s jewellery specialist, Chiang Shui-Fung, says the diamond is extremely rare.

The briolette is special because they have to find a piece rough and big enough to cut into that style. The diamond came to an American dealership named William Goldberg, as a 160.5- carat rough weight and had to be shaped into the now 75.51 carat diamond. To achieve this brilliant rare cut William Goldberg had to sacrifice more than half the stone’s weight in the meticulous cutting process. The diamond is now a stunning piece and will be remembered as a historical record breaking event.

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Earrings

Jewellery is a very personal accessory which can make it hard to choose the right piece when shopping for someone else. The very fact that earrings are worn so close to the face make them even more personal.

Some women wear the same jewellery daily regardless of the occasion, others don’t wear jewellery at all – for these women, it might be best to pick a different gift. Anyone else, though, you can have a good shot at it if you know what to look for.

Colour:

Does she wear only silver and white gold? Only yellow gold? Or both? What colour clothes does she tend to go for? Many women like to wear neutral colours and may be seen with a coloured stone ring, but would not wear the colour more prominently in earrings, for example. If she’s not often seen in colour, stick to neutral coloured stones and detailing for example black onyx, smokey quartz, diamond, pearl. When looking at colours, consider her hair, skin and eyes – different pigmentation suits different colour groups so even if you are attracted to the yellow citrine, your pale skinned brunette girlfriend may not agree.

Size/Shape:

This is especially important for earrings. Consider hair length and style. If she often wears her hair tucked behind her ears or up in a hair piece then studs may look stunning, but if she has a cut that frames her face more then those beautiful diamonds will never be seen! Long faces can benefit from a wider shaped earring whereas wider faces prefer more slender earrings. Long necks look exotic with longer earrings while these are just not going to work on a shorter neck.

Metal and findings (the bit that goes in the ear):

Apart from colour, metal is also important to consider for allergies. Many women have sensitivities to metals used in jewellery findings. It is most common to be allergic to nickel. Therefore look for higher quality findings or when shopping for costume jewellery ask the retailer if any are hypoallergenic. Consider the style of finding too – older women often have stiffness and less dexterity in their fingers so when buying Grandma some new pearl drop earrings, check that there are no complex mechanisms that she might struggle with. A simple sheppard hook would be best for her. If your girlfriend wears scarfs often, however, look for something with a locking mechanism like a closed hoop or screw stud.

Once you have these things figured out, and you have taken note of what she wears most often, then you are ready to go to your local jeweler and check out what they have that fits your criteria. One more thing to consider is matching sets. Many earring designs will have a matching pendant or necklace. Many women like to wear matching sets, and the beauty of these is that they don`t have to be worn together but look amazing when they are. So if you have nailed the style and present her with the full set then its like a 3 in 1! Necklace, earrings and set – how could you go wrong?

Look for a jeweler that you can talk to easily and will help you know what you are looking at. They sell jewellery every day and have a good idea of what different people look for, and if you have already done your homework then together you should find something she will love – maybe even show them a picture of her on your phone? – and always ask for the return policy to cover your back if you are unsure.

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