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christies green diamond

christies green diamond

A 6.13-carat fancy intense green diamond set a new per-carat record when it sold at Christie’s on May 27 for a whopping $3.6 million, or $594,510 per carat. The square cushion cut diamond is the center of a rose gold halo style ring, accentuated by natural pink diamonds.

Next to red, green is the rarest of colors found in natural diamonds. For most colored diamonds, the color comes from trace amounts of mineral impurities or extreme pressure conditions while the diamond was forming. The tight chemical structure makes it very difficult for any impurities to enter, which is why colored diamonds are exceedingly rare. Small amounts of boron in the crystal lattice structure of a diamond, for example, will impart a blue hue; same goes with nitrogen for yellow, and hydrogen for violet. What gives a diamond a green hue however, is the presence of natural radiation over millions of years. Because the radiation exposure is an external force rather than internal force (such as mineral impurities and lattice defects), it acts on the surface only. As a result, green diamonds are not green all the way through; the color is concentrated on the outer layers and tends to be weakly saturated. That is why a fancy intense green diamond, especially one of a size like this one, is almost a once-in-a-lifetime find.

This spectacular diamond joins the ranks of other recently sold, record-breaking gems at Christie’s. At their Geneva auction just last month, there were three record-breakers alone. They include ‘The Blue’, a fancy vivid blue pear shaped diamond weighing over 13 carats, a 76.5 carat light pink square-cut diamond that sold for $10.2 million, and the ‘Ocean Dream’ – a 5.5 carat, vivid blue-green diamond that went for $8.8million.

 

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Faces“Faces of Eternity” is the new exhibition being displayed at the Gemological Institute of America’s headquarters in Carlsbad, California. The exhibition features a collection of 15 carved skulls by a Peruvian artist Luis Alberto Quispe Aparicio. The skulls are made from various large gemstone crystals, ornamental rocks and silver and gold vermeil. It’s inspired by the contrast of human mortality and the timelessness of gemstones.

“From fossilized whale bone to rainforest jasper, and from pink opal to peanut wood agate, Aparicio chose materials from a gem lover’s dream. Each skull has a distinctive look and feel to it, making this collection fascinating on both a gemological and artistic level,” said Terri Ottaway, GIA museum curator.

One of the skulls called “Everlasting Youth” was carved from Mozambican aquamarine with rock crystal quartz and gold vermeil.  “Top Hat Gentle-skull” is made in rock crystal quartz from Madagascar with snowflake obsidian and gold vermeil. Another called “Chocolate with Peanut Butter” skull is made with petrified palm  wood agate from Australia with obsidian and gold vermeil.

“The skulls collection was one of my favorite to create. By carving natural gemstones with a combination of lapidary art and metal smith techniques, you can really see how the colors and textures in each stone brings each piece to life,” Aparicio said.Faces

His whole collection is comprised of 26 pieces all made within one year. The other 11 pieces not found in the exhibition are in private collections in the USA, the U.K, France and Russia. He works with his sister Sylvia at their family owned company called Neoart Peru established in 1975. The company specializes in ruby carvings with a focus on wildlife inspired themes using very rare and unusual gemstones.

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cheapsidehoardfullA treasure that was uncovered 100 years ago by a workman is going to now be on display for the first time next fall in the Museum of London.  The entire chest called the Cheapside Hoard which includes hundreds of gold and gem studded Tudor and Jacobean jewellery.  There are many questions and possible murder mystery tales surrounding this jewellery which makes its value more than just its weight in gold. It also can tell us about the life during this time in London a period from between 1558 to 1625. Some questions that arise are whose jewels were these? Why was it hidden? Why hasn’t it ever been claimed?

It was first discovered in 1912 when it was buried in a cellar on Cheapside in the City of London.  A workman’s pickaxe smashed through the brick floor more than a century ago and it was left forgotten. When an old house was being demolished on Cheapside the hoard was found and remains priceless.

Swan

“Nothing in the world comes close,” said Museum of London curator Hazel Forsyth. He has been studying the pieces for a long time now. Some of the jewelry includes necklaces, rings, brooches, chains, pearls, rubies, fan holders, scent bottles and two carved gems dating back 1,300 years ago. The most delicate of items are fine gold enamel chains with gems on them up to two meters long they were stitched on gowns and hung from collar to waist as a dazzling display. “This collection has been misunderstood and misinterpreted, dismissed as jewelry for the merchant classes,” Forsyth said. “But at this date the merchants were among the wealthiest people in the land; they had far more disposable wealth than the aristocracy.” Along with the massive rubies, and pearls the size of acorns there are sapphires, emeralds and some fake stones made of quartz crystal which have been dyed and carved to look like precious gems.

New research of a specific gem known as “The Stafford Intaglio”, an oval shaped piece of engraved cornelian, suggest the time it was buried between 1640 and 1666.  The engraved piece is a badge of Stafford with a swan and a wreath, there was only one Viscount Stafford by the name of William Howard in 1640.

broochTwo other pieces from the Cheapside Hoard is a salamander shaped brooch set with Colombian emeralds and table cut diamonds from India. The other is a gold enamel ring set with moonstone and engraved with a frog.

Another extremely rare piece is a hexagonal emerald watch, one of the most unusual and decadent pieces found, one of a kind no other in its era had ever been recorded.

All these jewels will be displayed together they are the single most important knowledge of early modern jewelry worldwide.

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NecklaceTo highlight the birthstone of June Christies London Auction sells a pearl necklace for $1.64 million! The entire auction was 77% sold by lot and another 90% sold by value. Another gorgeous item was a diamond natural pearl brooch that came to $663,829. Along with the pearls a antique sapphire diamond necklace sold for $461,869. The entire lot of 278 items came to a grand total of $13.4 million. Keith Penton, head of the London jewelry department, said in a statement. “The results illustrate the continued strength in the market for natural pearls.”

Natural pearls are a rare and beautiful item.  Their consistent stream in the fashion department dates all the way back to the Han Dynasty in 206 BC. Pearls have been found and sought out after in areas like the Indian Ocean, Persian Gulf, Red Sea, Arabian Sea and South China Sea. Before the 20th century pearl hunting was the most common way of reaping the sweet rewards of an oyster to find it’s pearl. Divers would manually pull oysters from the ocean floor but not all mussels and oysters produce pearls. After hauling three tons only three or four oysters would produce the perfect pearl. Not all pearls are round either the ideal pearl is perfectly smooth and round but many other shapes of pearls exists that are named baroque pearls.

A pearl is formed inside of the shell of an oyster by way of defense mechanism against irritation. When a foreign substance slips into the oyster between its mantle the oyster reacts to protect itself. The foreign substance gets covered in layers of nacre (calcium carbonate) produced from its mantle to seal off any irritation. Nacre is secreted repeatedly many times which produces layers and layers of build up producing a stunning pearl. Since the foreign substance isn’t always perfectly round then pearls can form in different shapes depending on the radius of the substance placed inside.

It is the finest quality of pearl that makes it to the gemstone and jewellery line and the world agrees in loving them for their fine, rare, admirable and valuable qualities.

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