necklace

You are currently browsing articles tagged necklace.

dom pedroThe Dom Pedro is a stunning example of March’s official birthstone, and is also the largest faceted aquamarine specimen in the world.

At 1,363 carats and nearly 36cm tall, the fantasy-cut Dom Pedro aquamarine can certainly hold its own – even when on display at the Smithsonian’s Janet Annenberg Hooker Hall of Geology, which houses other highly valuable gems like the Hope Diamond and the De Young Red Diamond.

The Dom Pedro was cut from part of a meter-long, 45kg aquamarine crystal that was discovered in the 1980’s in the Brazilian state of Minas Gerais. While in transportation, the crystal actually fractured into three separate pieces. The two smaller pieces were eventually cut into many smaller gemstones, but the largest was kept intact as it embodied an exquisite greenish-blue hue and amazing clarity. This largest piece was sold to none other than legendary gem-cutter Bernd Munsteiner, known as the “Father of the Fantasy Cut” and “the Picasso of Gems”.

According to the Smithsonian, the first time that he laid eyes on the gem he proclaimed that it was love at first sight!

Munsteiner spent over four months studying the rough and making hundreds of sketches before he settled on the aquamarine’s dom pedro munsteinerfinal pattern. It was to be his most famous “fantasy cut” gem, a cutting technique where negative cuts are faceted into the back of a gemstone to reflect the light within.

During the six months it took to hand cut the gem, he was never concerned about the final carat weight; he opted instead to cut for beauty and brilliance, rather than price. “When you focus on the carat weight, it’s only about the money,” said Munsteiner. “I cannot create when I’m worried about the money.”

The finished masterpiece was unveiled at the 1993 Baselworld Gem Fair, and later bought by private collector Jane Mitchell and her husband Jeffrey Bland. They gifted the stone to the Smithsonian’s National Gem and Mineral Collection in 2011, and by the end of 2012 Dom Pedro was added to the permanent exhibition and continues to be a top attraction.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

name necklace

Personalised gifts are the key. Personalised gifts can make a average present into something stunning and meaningful. A lot of gifts can be personalized and jewellery is one of them! Here’s some reasons why to personalize your jewelry:

  •  It’s practical. For example, if you make a gold name plate or initial necklace, with or without diamonds, it’s something she can wear every single day, not just a piece to go with any outfit.
  •  It’s the thoughts. You have to either custom made something or do extra work to present this personal gift. The thought and work behind it let the recipient know you’ve taken the time to give a thoughtful gift, specially for them.
  • A personal touch: Of course it’s personal! You didn’t pick it out from a bunch of stuff made available to you, for instance, you didn’t pick out from a bunch of stuff that’s made available for you to pick from.
  •  Treasure item: People love to see items personalized making them feel special and that item uniquely made just for them.

 

Tags: , , , , , ,

cheapsidehoardfullA treasure that was uncovered 100 years ago by a workman is going to now be on display for the first time next fall in the Museum of London.  The entire chest called the Cheapside Hoard which includes hundreds of gold and gem studded Tudor and Jacobean jewellery.  There are many questions and possible murder mystery tales surrounding this jewellery which makes its value more than just its weight in gold. It also can tell us about the life during this time in London a period from between 1558 to 1625. Some questions that arise are whose jewels were these? Why was it hidden? Why hasn’t it ever been claimed?

It was first discovered in 1912 when it was buried in a cellar on Cheapside in the City of London.  A workman’s pickaxe smashed through the brick floor more than a century ago and it was left forgotten. When an old house was being demolished on Cheapside the hoard was found and remains priceless.

Swan

“Nothing in the world comes close,” said Museum of London curator Hazel Forsyth. He has been studying the pieces for a long time now. Some of the jewelry includes necklaces, rings, brooches, chains, pearls, rubies, fan holders, scent bottles and two carved gems dating back 1,300 years ago. The most delicate of items are fine gold enamel chains with gems on them up to two meters long they were stitched on gowns and hung from collar to waist as a dazzling display. “This collection has been misunderstood and misinterpreted, dismissed as jewelry for the merchant classes,” Forsyth said. “But at this date the merchants were among the wealthiest people in the land; they had far more disposable wealth than the aristocracy.” Along with the massive rubies, and pearls the size of acorns there are sapphires, emeralds and some fake stones made of quartz crystal which have been dyed and carved to look like precious gems.

New research of a specific gem known as “The Stafford Intaglio”, an oval shaped piece of engraved cornelian, suggest the time it was buried between 1640 and 1666.  The engraved piece is a badge of Stafford with a swan and a wreath, there was only one Viscount Stafford by the name of William Howard in 1640.

broochTwo other pieces from the Cheapside Hoard is a salamander shaped brooch set with Colombian emeralds and table cut diamonds from India. The other is a gold enamel ring set with moonstone and engraved with a frog.

Another extremely rare piece is a hexagonal emerald watch, one of the most unusual and decadent pieces found, one of a kind no other in its era had ever been recorded.

All these jewels will be displayed together they are the single most important knowledge of early modern jewelry worldwide.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

DiamondThe most flawless, biggest briolette ever to surface at auction weighing at a stunning 75.36ct broke records! This diamond was sold for a world record at $11,145,734 from an anonymous buyer at Christie’s Hong Kong’s Magnificent Jewels sale. This pendant necklace was originally valued at a pre-sale low estimate of $8.5 million, which it easily surpassed.  It did fall short of its high pre-sale estimate of $12.5 million.

Diamond

 

 

 

 

 

The briolette is a traditional cut popular in the Victorian times but has recently become more popular in precious and semi-precious stones. It is a stone cut into a three-dimensional waterdrop shape.  Its elegant pear shape with cut facets dangles below a marquise-cut purplish-pink diamond. Adorned with stations of smaller briolettes with 18 karat white and rose gold adjustable neck chain, this piece is a classy stunner!

An auction spokesperson said the diamond was “perfect,” and had the proof of an assessment with the Gemological Institute of America. The GIA rated the stone Type IIa, which is the top quality grade.  The diamond is similar to the British Queen Elizabeth’s one she has set in her crown. Christie’s jewellery specialist, Chiang Shui-Fung, says the diamond is extremely rare.

The briolette is special because they have to find a piece rough and big enough to cut into that style. The diamond came to an American dealership named William Goldberg, as a 160.5- carat rough weight and had to be shaped into the now 75.51 carat diamond. To achieve this brilliant rare cut William Goldberg had to sacrifice more than half the stone’s weight in the meticulous cutting process. The diamond is now a stunning piece and will be remembered as a historical record breaking event.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,